Drawing of opium pipe

Asian American Comparative Collection: Publications

Priscilla Wegars, Ph.D., Volunteer Curator
Asian American Comparative Collection (AACC)
University of Idaho
875 Perimeter Drive, MS 1111
Moscow, Idaho 83844-1111 USA
208-885-7075
pwegars@uidaho.edu

Publications Available from the AACC and other Sources

To order, please prepay your order by sending a check or money order (made payable to Asian American Comparative Collection or AACC; sorry, no credit cards) to AACC, University of Idaho, 875 Perimeter Drive, MS 1111, Moscow, ID 83844-1111. All prices include tax, postage to U.S. addresses, and handling. For foreign addresses, please inquire.



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          Rugged as the Terrain" As Rugged as the Terrain: CCC “Boys,” Federal Convicts, and World War II Alien Internees Wrestle with a Mountain Wilderness, by Priscilla Wegars with a Foreword by Dick Hendricks, explores some intriguing history of Idaho’s wild and scenic Lochsa River. In 1893 this site, at turbulent Canyon Creek, was a footnote in the saga of the ill-fated Carlin hunting party. Next, in 1933, it held nearly 200 tent-dwelling Civilian Conservation Corps recruits, most from New York State. The antics of these “city slickers” provide colorful insights into CCC camps housing young men far from home. In 1935 the site became Federal Prison Camp No. 11, a road-building facility for convicts mostly from the Leavenworth, Kansas, penitentiary. The authorities stressed rehabilitation, rather than punishment, but because the camp was not fenced, a few escapes occurred, some quite thrilling. The prison camp closed in May 1943, and Japanese detainees at the Kooskia Internment Camp continued road construction for two more years; see Priscilla Wegars’ Imprisoned in Paradise: Japanese Internee Road Workers at the World War II Kooskia Internment Camp (2010). Several chapters in Rugged continue the Japanese internees’ story, and compare it with the experiences of Italian and German internees in the vicinity. 393 + xxxviii (431) pages, 110 illustrations, plus notes, appendices, bibliography, index. Pb, $25.00; if you wish it autographed, please specify recipient.  All author's royalties benefit the AACC.


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        "Imprisoned in Paradise"







The long-awaited account of Idaho's World War II Kooskia Internment Camp is now available. Titled Imprisoned in Paradise: Japanese Internee Road Workers at the World War II Kooskia Internment Camp, by Priscilla Wegars, with a foreword by Michiko Midge Ayukawa, it describes a unique, virtually forgotten, World War II detention and road building facility that was located on the remote, wild, and scenic Lochsa River in north central Idaho at the site of an earlier CCC camp and a former federal prison camp above Lowell, Idaho. Between mid-1943 and mid-1945 the Kooskia (KOOS-key) camp held an all-male contingent of some 265 so-called "enemy aliens" of Japanese ancestry. Most came from 21 states and 2 territories, but others were from Mexico; some were even kidnapped from Panama and Peru. Two alien internee doctors, an Italian and later a German, provided medical services; 25 Caucasian employees included several women; and a Japanese American man censored the mail. Despite having committed no crimes, but suspected of potential sabotage, these noncitizen U.S. residents of Japanese descent had been interned elsewhere in the U.S. following Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941. They volunteered for transfer to the Kooskia Internment Camp and earned wages for helping build the Lewis-Clark Highway, now Highway 12, between Lewiston, Idaho, and Missoula, Montana, supervised by U.S. Bureau of Public Roads employees. Whereas some of the all-male internees held camp jobs, most of these paid volunteers were construction workers, operating heavy equipment or laboring with picks and shovels. The internees found this area of the Idaho wilderness to be a welcome change from the barbed wire of the Santa Fe Detention Center and other places where they were previously confined. For example, Yoshito Kadotani, a landscape gardener from Santa Cruz, California, called it "… a paradise in mountains!," saying, "It reminds me so much of Yosemite National Park." Knowledge of their rights under the 1929 Geneva Convention empowered the Kooskia internees to successfully challenge administrative mistreatment, thereby regaining much of the self-respect they had lost by being so unjustly interned. 323 + xxxiv (357) pages, 112 illustrations, appendix, notes, bibliography. Pb, $25.00; if you wish it autographed, please specify recipient.  All author's royalties benefit the AACC.

Polly Bemis: A Chinese American Pioneer, a biography for 4th grade to adult readers.  Hardcover, full color, published by Backeddy Books in 2003 to honor the sesquicentennial (150-year-anniversary) of Polly's birth in 1853.  Polly Bemis, the Pacific Northwest’s most famous Chinese woman, lived in Idaho for over 60 years.  After her parents in China sold her, she was smuggled into this country, purchased by a Chinese man, and brought to Warren, Idaho.  Polly married Charlie Bemis in 1894 and they settled on the remote Salmon River.  Charlie died in 1922 and Polly died in 1933.  Polly Bemis: A Chinese American Pioneer received the Idaho Library Association's honorable mention for the best book about Idaho published in 2003. All author's royalties will benefit the University of Idaho's Asian American Comparative Collection.  For an autographed copy (specify recipient), send a check for $19.00 to the AACC at the address above.

See also the lengthy chapter "Polly Bemis: Lurid Life or Literary Legend?" in Wild Women of the Old West, edited by Glenda Riley and Richard W. Etulain, 45-68, 200-203, Golden, CO: Fulcrum. Sorry, NOT available from the AACC.

Cover of Chinese American Death RitualsChinese American Death Rituals: Respecting the Ancestors, edited by Sue Fawn Chung and Priscilla Wegars. Why is there sometimes a chicken in a Chinese funeral procession? Why are Chinese Americans bringing the remains of their ancestors to the US for reburial? Why would Chinese Americans place coins in the coffin or in the mouth, ears, hands, or eyes of their deceased? Why would they leave food at the grave site and burn paper replicas of cell phones and other objects there? Chung and Wegars and a selection of expert contributors answer these questions and more in Chinese American Death Rituals. For a review in the Asian Reporter, see http://www.asianreporter.com/reviews/2006/18-06chineseamerican.htm. Contents: Introduction, by Sue Fawn Chung and Priscilla Wegars; Chapter 1, "'What We Didn’t Understand': A History of Chinese Death Ritual in China and California," by Wendy L. Rouse; Chapter 2, "On Dying American: Cantonese Rites for Death and Ghost-Spirits in an American City," by Paul G. Chace; Chapter 3, "Archaeological Excavations at Virginiatown’s Chinese Cemeteries," by Wendy L. Rouse; Chapter 4, "Venerate These Bones: Chinese American Funerary and Burial Practices as Seen in Carlin, Elko County, Nevada," by Sue Fawn Chung, Fred P. Frampton, and Timothy W. Murphy; Chapter 5, "Respecting the Dead: Chinese Cemeteries and Burial Practices in the Interior Pacific Northwest," by Terry Abraham and Priscilla Wegars; Chapter 6, "Remembering Ancestors in Hawai'i," by Sue Fawn Chung and Reiko Neizman; Chapter 7, "The Chinese Mortuary Tradition in San Francisco Chinatown," by Linda Sun Crowder; Chapter 8, "Old Rituals in New Lands: Bringing the Ancestors to America," by Roberta S. Greenwood; illustrations, notes, bibliography, index, 320 pages. All authors' royalties benefit the AACC. Published in 2005 by AltaMira Press.

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        of Chinese Servants in the WestChinese Servants in the West: Florence Baillie-Grohman's "The Yellow and White Agony." Edited, and with an introduction, by Terry Abraham. 65 pages, two photos, notes, bibliography, index. Pb, $10.00.  The nineteenth century West Coast labor shortage, exacerbated by the pull of the gold fields, was as acute on the domestic front as on the commercial. Chinese laborers were recruited to fill the positions of cook, houseboy, "parlormaid," and "housemaid." Far from being stereotypical, the Chinese servant was much more complex, both individually and within the context of a broader social hierarchy. Many of the negative attributions assigned to Chinese domestics were, in fact, commonly applied to others, of different races or sexes, who found themselves in or were forced into the servant role. One account in particular, that of Florence Nickalls Baillie-Grohman, provides an unparalleled first-hand story of individual Chinese servants and their "Missus."  Asian American Comparative Collection Research Report, No. 2, 2007.  Series Editor, Priscilla Wegars. Moscow, ID: University of Idaho Asian American Comparative Collection. 65 pages, two photos, notes, bibliography, index. Pb, $12.00 from AACC.  All proceeds benefit the AACC.

Cover of ASTP ASTRP bookletAsian Americans and the Military's Academic Training Programs (ASTP, ASTRP) at the University of Idaho and Elsewhere during World War II, by Charles M. Rice. The UI ASTP/ASTRP participants included six Japanese Americans, several Chinese Americans, and one Filipino American, whose hometowns were Los Angeles, Manzanar, Sacramento, San Diego, San Francisco, and San Mateo, CA; Boston, MA; Vale, OR; and Garland, Provo, and Topaz, UT. Manzanar and Topaz were, of course, both War Relocation Authority concentration camps. Brief sections discuss Japanese Americans and World War II, the Army Specialized Training Program (ASTP), the Army Specialized Training Reserve Program (ASTRP), Asian Americans in the ASTP and ASTRP, Subjects Studied in ASTP and ASTRP, Language Instruction, Area Studies, Experiences of Racial Minorities in ASTP/ASTRP, Racism and Discrimination, Japanese Americans Achieve Redress, and Noteworthy Asian American Participants in ASTP and ASTRP. Asian American Comparative Collection Research Report, No. 1. 2005. Series Editor, Priscilla Wegars. Moscow, ID: University of Idaho Asian American Comparative Collection. Booklet, 13 pages, 2 photos (1 color), notes, bibliography. Pb, $6.00. All proceeds benefit the AACC.

AACC
        postcardAACC Color Postcard. Features artifacts representing a variety of Asian cultures. Three for $1.00. All proceeds benefit the AACC.

Chinese at the Confluence:  Lewiston's Beuk Aie Temple, by Priscilla Wegars.  Lewiston, ID:  Confluence Press in association with Lewis-Clark Center for Arts & History, 2000; xii + 41 pages; map, historic and artifact photographs (most full color), references consulted.  Brief sections on the Chinese in the West, the Chinese in Lewiston, Chinese religion, Lewiston's Beuk Aie Temple, the Hip Sing Tong, Chinese women, daily life, occupations, and Chinese mining.  Paperbound; $6.00. All proceeds benefit the AACC.

Chinese Artifact Illustrations, Terminology, and Selected Bibliography. Compiled by Priscilla Wegars for the Chinese and Japanese Artifacts Workshop, Society for Historical Archaeology, Salt Lake City, UT, January 1999. Revised July 2012. 13 pages. Photocopy; $5.00. All proceeds benefit the AACC.

Japanese Artifact Illustrations, Terminology, and Selected Bibliography. Compiled by Priscilla Wegars for the Chinese and Japanese Artifacts Workshop, Society for Historical Archaeology, Salt Lake City, UT, January 1999. Revised July 2012. 9 pages. Photocopy; $4.00. All proceeds benefit the AACC.

Guardians and Ghostcatchers:  Preparing for Eternity in Ancient China, an Exhibition of Chinese Tomb Sculpture from the Collection of Dr. and Mrs. Robert B. Pamplin, Jr., by Alison T. Stenger.  Lewiston, ID:  Lewis-Clark Center for Arts & History, 1998; i + 16 pages; text, chronology, artifact illustrations (full color).  Paperbound; $5.00 prepaid. All proceeds benefit the AACC. Free with any other order!

The Ah Hee Diggings: Final Report of Archaeological Investigations at OR-GR-16, the Granite, Oregon "Chinese Walls" Site, 1992 through 1994, by Priscilla Wegars, with an Appendix on faunal analysis by Deborah L. Olson. University of Idaho Anthropological Reports, No. 97, Alfred W. Bowers Laboratory of Anthropology, University of Idaho, 1995; xvii + 250 pages; tables, maps, illustrations, artifact catalogue, bibliography. Paperbound; price reduced, $19.00. All proceeds benefit the AACC.

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        "Uncovering a Chinese Legacy"Uncovering a Chinese Legacy: Historical Archaeology at Centerville, Idaho, Once the 'Handsomest Town in the Basin,' by Priscilla Wegars. Idaho Cultural Resources Series, No. 5, Bureau of Land Management, Boise, 2001; xvii + 211 pages; photographs, maps, artifact illustrations, bibliography. Paperbound; available from the BLM Public Room, 208-373-3889, for $5.00; postage may be extra. Sorry, NOT available from the AACC. 

Archaeology and History of the Chinese in Southern New Zealand during the Nineteenth Century: A Study of Acculturation, Adaptation, and Change, by Neville A. Ritchie.
Doctoral thesis, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand, 1986; xx + 711 pp.; numerous illustrations and tables; unbound. $90.00. All proceeds benefit the AACC.

A Comparative Study of Mid-Nineteenth Century Chinese Blue-and-White Export Ceramics from the Frolic Shipwreck, Mendocino County, California, by Patricia Hagen Jones.
Master's thesis, San Jose State University, 1992; vii + 182 pages; numerous illustrations and tables. $25.00. All proceeds benefit the AACC.

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February 2016/publctns.htm/pwegars@uidaho.edu